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CIMI Blog

Biofluorescence: Sea Creatures Glow with Invisible Ink

You’ve probably heard of bioluminescence, where some ocean animals make their own light to communicate, attract prey, or distract predators. But did you know that much of the ocean world is already glowing in a way that’s invisible to your naked eye? Many corals, more than than 180 species of fish, some sharks, at least…

The Invertebrate: Sea Hare

The sea hare is one of the most amazing invertebrates you can see in the waters surrounding Catalina Island and here at CIMI. You can find two different species in our coves and our aquariums – the California sea hare and the black sea hare. Sea hares belong to the phylum mollusca, making them relatives…

The California Spiny Lobster

The California spiny lobster is a unique invertebrate (species lacking a backbone) that is found off the coast of southern California. This type of lobster belongs to a group of invertebrates known as Arthropoda. Arthropoda’s characteristics consist of having a segmented body, exoskeleton, and jointed appendages. These lobsters share the same grouping classification as insects…

Let’s Take a Closer Look at Microscopes!

The ocean is filled with critters we can’t see with the naked eye. Microscopes are an essential tool for learning how organisms develop, identifying diseases, how pollution travels through food webs, and what life exists below our range of vision. Microscopes have revolutionized how we study marine science and there are more to them than…

Living with La Nina

Here on Catalina our island is affected by a cyclical climate pattern known as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, or ENSO.  Within ENSO three different climate events can occur – El Nino, a Neutral state, or La Nina. Typically these different climate events within the ENSO switch back and forth every 3 to 7 years. For…

Awesome Osprey: Birds who love the ocean as much as we do!

Osprey (Pandion haliaetus), also known as sea hawks, are beautiful and unique birds of prey. They can be found worldwide and are most commonly seen around Catalina Island and Southern California during the winter months. Because osprey are piscivorous (fish-eating carnivores), they primarily live along coastlines, rivers, lakes, and other waterways surrounded by forested areas….

The Intertidal Zone and their Mighty Animals

Most people are familiar with the concept of tide pools; shallow puddles of water that form along flat rocky coastlines and are exposed when tides are low. However, you may not be aware of the daily drama that takes place in this area called the Intertidal Zone where animals must be well adapted to living…

Do fish sleep?

Did you have the chance to go on a night snorkel while you were at CIMI? If so, you may have seen all kinds of fishes actively swimming around – even in those late hours of the night! You may have asked yourself, if they’re moving around with their eyes open during my day snorkel…

How Fish Use an Otolith on their Ocean Odyssey

Fish spend their entire lives swimming all over the ocean. But have you ever seen one trip or fall on the journey? A major reason why fish are not the klutzes of the ocean is due to the otolith that they posses. Halibut otoliths (ThoseAlaskanGirls.blogspot.com) The otolith of a fish is a hard, calcium carbonate…

Catalina Schist – Rockin’ Out!

Time to turn back the clocks…to 100 million years ago! Catalina Island was formed from geological events back in the Mesozoic era when dinosaurs still roamed the Earth. The beautiful flora and fauna of Catalina Island sit on two main types of rock: igneous and metamorphic. Igneous rock is the younger of the two because…

WECOME TO THE CIMI BLOG

We would like to thank you for visiting our blog. Catalina Island Marine Institute is a hands-on marine science program with an emphasis on ocean exploration. Our classes and activities are designed to inspire students toward future success in their academic and personal pursuits. This blog is intended to provide you with up-to-date news and information about our camp programs, as well as current science and ocean happenings. This blog has been created by our staff who have at least a Bachelors Degree usually in marine science or related subjects. We encourage you to also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Google+, Twitter, and Vine to see even more of our interesting science and ocean information. Feel free to leave comments, questions, or share our blog with others. Please visit www.cimi.org for additional information. Happy Reading!

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